FIELDWORK

I have ample experience working at marine research stations on Notehern seas

Working in challenging, sometimes extreme, polar and marine environments was an invaluable experience that shaped my personality. It was a unique opportunity to develop my skills in operating, maintaining, and repairing research equipment. Besides its technical aspect, it became a part of my mindful attitude, which I cultivate in the lab today.

In the expeditions, I learned to be a strong team player, following commands or taking over the leading role when necessary. I learned agility and strategic planning, calculating risks, and being prepared for unforeseen circumstances or emergencies.

This experience, combined with my inherent strong sense of responsibility, prepared me for the role of an excursion leader. The lessons I learned from the expedition became valuable beyond the field work as well – in the regular academic lab environment.

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Helgoland

Biological Station Helgoland of Alfred-Wegener Institute

Helgoland Island, North Sea

54°18'32'' N, 7°88'87'' E

Every summer since 2013, I offer a 6-8 days field course “Developmental Biology of Marine Invertebrates”.

My role: course leader

Responsibilities:

  • funding acquisition from CAU Kiel, material sourcing and transportation

  • sampling littoral, pelagic and benthic invertebrates (plankton net, dredge, trawling) on research vessel Uthörn

  • in vitro experiments, imaging, student seminars.

Over the years, I have developed my unique teaching style in this series of field courses. This course combines engaging sampling sessions, fascinating lectures, insightful experiments, and captivating workshops. It offers not only a unique learning experience for the students (see Endorsements) but also a platform for me to learn and improve my teaching and mentoring competencies.

I appreciate the continuous support of Kathrin Böhmer, Uwe Nettelmann, and Eva-Maria Brodte. They provided an excellent welcoming environment for my field excursions.

 

Every summer since 2013, I offer a 6-8 days field course “Developmental Biology of Marine Invertebrates”.

My role: course leader

Responsibilities:

  • funding acquisition from CAU Kiel, material sourcing and transportation

  • sampling littoral, pelagic and benthic invertebrates (plankton net, dredge, trawling) on research vessel Uthörn

  • in vitro experiments, imaging, student seminars.

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Kartesh

White Sea Biological Station “Kartesh” of Zoological Institute of RAS

Chupa Inlet, Kandalaksha Bay, White Sea

66°33'74'' N, 33°64'82'' E

Every summer from 2004 till 2008, I participated in sampling expeditions, each 2-4 weeks long.

My role: researcher

Responsibilities:

  • fund acquisition from the Russian Foundation of Fundamental Research, material sourcing and transportation

  • sampling of littoral Gastropoda (Littorina, Buccinum), Bivalvia (Mya, Mytilus), and their Trematoda parasites

  • in vitro experiments, imaging

  • sample conservation for microscopy, immunochemical and transcriptomic analysis

The results of these expeditions were partially published in Journal of Evolutionary Biochemistry and Physiology and Experimental Parasitology.

 
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Dalniye Zelentsy

Marine Station of Murmansk Marine Biological Institute of RAS

Kola Peninsula, Barents Sea

69°06'56'' N, 36°04'10'' E

In summer 2007, I participated in a 2 weeks-long sampling expeditions to the Barents Sea coast.

My role: researcher

Responsibilities:

  • fund acquisition from the Russian Foundation of Fundamental Research, material sourcing and transportation

  • sampling of littoral Gastropoda (Littorina, Testudinalia)

  • in vitro experiments, imaging, sample conservation for microscopy (TEM) and immunochemical analysis

Due to a particularly remote location, complicated logistics, spartan lodging and working conditions, and extreme weather conditions, this expedition required enormous organization and planning skills, as well as extraordinary determination from my side. These experiences strengthened my confidence and affinity for field research.

 
 
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Belomorskaya

Marine Biological Station of St.-Petersburg State University

Srendiy Island, Chupa Inlet, Kandalaksha Bay, White Sea

66°17'21'' N, 33°39'41'' E

For three years, 2002 – 2008, I contributed field courses “Comparative Immunobiology” for students of St.-Petersburg State University, each 2 weeks-long in summer

Role: coarse leader assistant

Responsibilities:

  • equipment and fleet maintenance, material sourcing and transportation

  • sampling littoral, pelagic and benthic invertebrates (plankton net, dredge, trawling, benthic grab sampler)

  • assistance with experiments on Asterias, Mytilus, Aurelia

This early experience sparked my fascination with nature and my interest in marine biology. In retrospect, it profoundly impacted my development as a naturalist, researcher, and teacher.